Skip to main content

Copy or migrate shared folders to another server



Migrating or copying files to another server and retaining the permissions is a common task when migrating a file server.

If all permissions are successfully retained it will make the migration seamless and nobody will ever notice that a migration has taken place.

If there are shared folders and with different permissions, re-sharing the folder by scratch is just time consuming and giving access denied to users will be inevitable.

But how to copy files and folders, like it was exactly done on the old server?

In Windows environment, just 3 steps are needed. 3 steps sound easy and quick.

Steps below will work for NTFS permissions and folder access rights solely depends on it.

a.      Copy the files to the new server and retaining its permissions while files and folders are being copied
b.      Export the shares registry (old server)
c.      Import the shares registry (new server)

The link below from Microsoft website shows how xcopy can copy folder and retain the permissions.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-sg/help/323007/how-to-copy-a-folder-to-another-folder-and-retain-its-permissions

Copy folder and retain permissions:

At command prompt:

Type: xcopy source destination /O /X /E /H /K

Example:
Type: xcopy c:\olddocs c:\newdocs /O /X /E /H /K, and then press ENTER, where olddocs is the source folder and newdocs is the destination folder.

Xcopy switches have the following effects:
/E - Copies folders and subfolders, including empty ones.
/H - Copies hidden and system files also.
/K - Copies attributes. Typically, Xcopy resets read-only attributes.
/O - Copies file ownership and ACL information.
/X - Copies file audit settings (implies /O).


Aside from Xcopy, robocopy will come in handy to copy files and folders and retaining the permissions.

Robocopy syntax:

robocopy “source address” “destination address” *.* /mir /sec /log:migrate.log

Technet link below shows how to export the share registry:

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/408.how-to-back-up-and-restore-ntfs-and-share-permissions.aspx

To be done on the old server:

reg export HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Shares shareperms.reg

To be done on the new server:

reg import HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\LanmanServer\Shares shareperms.reg

After importing the registry, restart the server and check whether folders are shared or not. If everything goes well, shared folders will automatically appear and it will be ready for everyone to access.

To successfully migrate and automatically share the folder exactly as it was on the old server, drive letter and parent folder name should be the same or else it won’t match the imported registry settings.


Till next time..

================================
Free Android Apps:

Click  links below to find out more:

Excel Keyboard guide:


Heaven's Dew Fall  Prayer app for Android :



Catholic Rosary Guide  for Android:


Divine Mercy Chaplet Guide (A Powerful prayer):

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Copy a single file using robocopy

Copy a single file using robocopy from a local folder to a shared folder on the network.
A simple rule of thumb before any disaster strike, don't interchange the source and the destination.

If source and destination is mistakenly reverse, files might get overwritten. To avoid any loss of data do a test with a dummy file to ensure things work perfectly.
Robocopy [source][destination]   [file to be copied]
robocopy c:\local_c_folder  \\PC_network\shared_folder   file_to_be_copied_xx.txt
The command will be completed successfully provided the network access right has no issues.

Robocopy works quite good on large files. A simple copy or xcopy command will also work but the speed might vary.

Robocopy is free it can be accessed from command line. No need to install the resource kit tool if the operating system is Windows 7 or newer version.

Copy files with selected file extension using PowerShell and Robocopy:

$extension = ('.pdf', '.jpg', '.txt')
gci d:\WorkFolde…

WMIC List printers

WMIC comes handy if you are a command line junkie.

To list printers via command line type:

wmic printer get name  = = = this will list all the printers installed on a workstation

To list the printer name and the port name of the printers, type this command:

wmic printer get name, portname

Type this command below to list the printer drivers:

wmic printer get name, drivername

To get the device id:

wmic printer get name, deviceid

You can deploy a batch file startup script to check which printer is installed on the computers and redirect the output to a shared folder.

PowerShell can also be used in conjunction with WMIC command:
http://quickbytesstuff.blogspot.sg/2015/11/powershell-list-printers-of-remote.html


To see more WMIC tips, click on WMIC label below.

Cheers!!!

Linux Android App cheat sheet:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.LinuxMobileKit

WMIC get computer name

WMIC get computer model, manufacturer, computer name and  username.
WMIC is a command-line tool and that can generate information about computer model, its manufacturer, its username and other informations depending on the parameters provided.
Why would you need a command line tool if there’s a GUI to check?
If you have 20 or 100 computers, or even more. It’s quite a big task just checking the GUI to check the computer model and username.
If you have remote computers, you need to delegate someone in the remote office or location to check.
Or you can just write a batch file or script to automate the task.
Here’s the code below on how get computer model, manufacturer and the username.
Open an elevated command prompt and type:
wmic computersystem get "Model","Manufacturer", "Name", "UserName"
Just copy and paste the code above, the word “computersystem” does not need to be change to a computer name.
A sample output below will be generated if the co…