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Check if 32 bit or 64 bit processor from command line

How to check processor architecture whether its 32bit or 64bit?
One method is to query the registry from the command line.
Here’s a one liner command line that will check whether the PC processor is 32bit or 64bit.
reg query "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment" | find “ARCHITECTURE”
If the output is something like this:
PROCESSOR_ARCHITECTUREREG_SZAMD64

Then it’s a 64bit, if it shows x86 then it’s a 32 bit.
reg query "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment" | find “IDENTIFIER”
Above query can also identify, the output shows Intel64 for 64bit.
Sample Output: PROCESSOR_IDENTIFIERREG_SZIntel64 Family 6 Model 142 Stepping 10, GenuineIntel

Omitting the find option from the “reg query” command will show quite a few information.
reg query "HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Environment"
This query command works in Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows 10. I believe this will also work in Windows s…

Linux copy files and change date or time

So, you want to copy files from one folder to another folder and change both the source and destination timestamp?
Linux can easily change or modify the timestamp with ‘touch’ command.
A one liner command with the help of ‘pipe’ to pass the arguments and ‘xargs’ to execute multiple commands in a single line can easily accomplish this task.
Command below will copy the files in the current directory where ‘ls’ command is executed to the directory ‘xfiles’, timestamp will be changed to 7 hours less from the current time.
ls | xargs -I % sh -c 'touch -d "7 hours ago" %; cp -p % ./xfiles';
-p option is important to preserve the modified timestamp
Note: the above command will change the timestamp for both source files and destination files.
Command below will change the source timestamp, but the destination timestamp will be the date and time that the command was executed.
ls | xargs -I % sh -c 'touch -d "2 Aug" %; cp % ./x';

Notice, that the -p option is omitted …